Join our community of makers. Check out our upcoming workshops!

Rare Early Pusher Biplane with boat hull carrying passengers

Early Pusher Biplane with boat hull carrying passengers 

From a large estate archive of Henry Woodhouse, photos of early aviation/aircraft. Henry Woodhouse was born Mario Terenzio Enrico Casalegno on June 24, 1884. He began his career in nyc, as an aviation writer under the pen name Henry Woodhouse (which he soon legally adopted). Despite his seedy character, he was a well-known authority in the world of aviation. He wrote several books, which still serves as aviation literature reference.  “He was a contributor to such publications as Collier's Weekly, McClure's, Metropolitan, The Independent, World's Work, and the New York Times. He quickly started to gain fame as an expert on the subject of aviation around the world.” wiki

This original photo looks like it was prepped for cropping perhaps for a publication (pencil markings) indicating the margin and arrow lines.

Upon zooming in on the pilot, he looks eerily like Charles Lindbergh (cannot confirm pilot, passengers). What we can gather is it is it is an early Pusher Bi-plane capable of carrying (6) passengers (Very Early Airline).

The design is flying machine with a boat hull, intended for both land and water. 

We would love to learn more, if you are knowledgable about this image, please share with us!

(Included courtesy: Archival framed for protection)

  • Title:Early Pusher Biplane with boat hull carrying passengers 
  • Photographer: unknown photographer/location/original date of printing. From a large estate archive of Henry Woodhouse, NYC- photos of early aviation/aircraft
  • Date:  Early 1900's
  • Culture:American
  • Medium: black & white photograph
  • Dimensions:4.5 x 6.5" photo, 5.25 x 9.5" board backing
  • Classification: Transportation: aviation/aircraft
  • Condition: Age-related toning/light wear. Pencil/red wax pencil writing/markings on back. Photo is permanently mounted/affixed to stiff paper board. Board has irregular edges, as shown.